It Is Not Hard To Diagnose a Cold

Generation by generation, people tell and learn what is the cold.

During the initial stage of invasion and growth of cold viruses, your body’s immune system has a minor reaction. It is so mild that you may not feel anything is wrong. When the magnitude of inflammation, the fire in your nose and throat, becomes bigger, the inflammatory secretion, or mucus, runs down to your throat. You have a sore throat at an early stage, and then you will start coughing and sneezing and feeling the nasal congestion. That is when you know you have a cold. Most people have had the cold experience many times. Here is a list of the common symptoms of a cold:

• Sore throat—The viral infection and inflammation occurs in the throat during the cold. Sore throats can be painful and annoying.

• Cough—The thick mucus produced during a cold virus infection will drip down into the throat and upper chest, thus causing a cough.

• Sneezing—A sneeze is a strong, sudden, uncontrolled burst of air through the nose and mouth. Sneezing is caused by an irritation to the nasal lining or the throat from the mucus generated by a cold viral infection.

• Nasal congestion—The blockage of the nasal passages is due to membranes lining the nose becoming swollen from inflamed blood vessels. Nasal congestion can interfere with hearing and speech. Significant congestion may interfere with sleep, cause snoring, and be associated with sleep apnea.

It is not hard for you to self-diagnose a cold. Yes, the diagnosis of a disease should usually be made by a physician, but for the common cold, most often you are pretty good. You’ve experienced this common disease many times in the past. Every family has an accumulated knowledge of the common cold, gained over generations, and there really have not been many changes in colds for hundreds of years.

It is also helpful if you know you came into contact with someone recently who had a cough or was sneezing not too far away from you. Knowledge of this close contact is particularly important for a self-diagnosis if this happens in the cold season. If you have any doubt, you should consult with your physician.

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